Sivana Podcast: How To Be Spiritual As Hell – Interview With The Ultra Spiritual JP Sears…

Episode #30

Sivana Podcast: How To Be Spiritual As Hell – Interview With The Ultra Spiritual JP Sears

Special Guest

JP Sears

I’m an emotional healing coach, international teacher, world traveler, and curious student of life. My work is intended to empower…
I’m an emotional healing coach, international teacher, world traveler, and curious student of life. My work is intended to empower…

The Full Discussion

From the sublime and serious to the ridiculous and funny, JP Sears has affected millions of people through his widely popular YouTube and Facebook videos. Although many know him from his comedy routines, JP is a deeply introspective and cultivated being who plays with humor as a means of exploring life and the ego. In this episode, we consider what it means to live a spiritual life, discuss the importance of humor on the spiritual path, offer thoughts on authenticity and much more!  There is a lot to enjoy in this episode filled with both insight and laughter.

JP:

I think what we resist persists, so if we in that rhyme, of course I’m gullible enough to believe it. So I think if we try to fight the ego, then it’s just like resistance training a muscle, it will get stronger. So to me, the language of humor is very much  embracing almost feminine energy, there’s nothing really resisting at. So for me, humor is a way to play with the ego and to actually highlight how damn delusional we are and celebrate it with playfulness.



Announcer:

Namaste, you’re listening to the Sivana podcast. Join us on an exploration of eastern spirituality, yoga philosophy and conscious living for the New Age. This podcast is a production of sivanaspirit.com, where you can find a large selection of om and yoga clothing, spiritual jewelry and unique fair trade gifts from the Far East. Now here’s your host, Ashton Szabo.

Ashton:



Greetings everyone, welcome to the sivana podcast. I’m your host, Ashton Szabo.

Our guest today is J.P. Sears who many of you will know through his wildly popular YouTube videos, “Awakening with J.P. and the Ultra Spiritual Life”. He is a life coach, a teacher, a public speaker and he’s freaking hilarious.

J.P, really happy to have you on the show today. Welcome.

JP:

Ashton, thank you for the welcome and I’m glad that you’re happy to have me.

I;d admit it. I would feel awkward if you go, J.P. I’m sad to have you on the show, why did you want to today? But nonetheless, I’m super thrilled to be here with you brother.

Ashton:

Well thank you!

I think for some of our people, I think most people know who you are, everyone that I know in my circles and communities knows who you are. But speaking to that, I think a lot of people know you through your comedy skits in  the comedy that you do.

But if they go to your channel or your website they realize that you have a really serious side to yourself as well and I think it’s easy when you’re doing that to recognize that you’re not just a comedian looking from the outside and kind of just poking fun at the things you see, but rather you’re someone in this world and totally immersed in it and you’re actually using humor as a teaching method as a way of kind of exposing some of the the dark underbelly of the yoga spirituality new age type community.

Are people shocked when they find out that you have the serious side?

JP:

Yes,  some are in part of the shock, it can come across as just utter confusion. I get messages on the regular, it just sounds when I say “I’m the regular”, but anyway I get messages on the regular saying,

“J.P I watch your comedy videos, then I got deeper into your channel, so are these serious videos?, then I got to your website it actually looks like you actually do coaching. Like,

What the hell’s the deal? Are you humorous or are you serious?”

And my answer is yes, I’m both. There are two parts that help make up the whole of me and I think we’re so used to kind of like we want to put someone in a box. Like I want to understand who someone is, somehow i want to understand the infinite entirety of that person in one small little box or label, they’re serious, they’re humorous, they’re whatever they are. But I think myself, and I dare say everybody else have way more dimensions than one mode of expression, one mode of identification..

So absolutely! I’m serious and humorous and I think I’m a lot in between as well.  And I do my best to be dynamic, I don’t want to be dysfunctional stuck in humor all the time go to funerals and have to crack jokes to deflect from the intimacy. And times when life is too important to take seriously. I don’t want to be stuck in this serious polarity,

I want to be able to be dynamic and do my best to interface with life in the best possible way whether it’s humor, it’s serious or the space in between.

Aston:

When you’re starting out, I mean obviously you’re a very naturally funny guy. This isn’t some sort of like forced calculated thing like, oh I’m going to start being funny at things.

But what caused the shift to kind of move from the more serious stuff to creating these parody and comedic videos that you do?

JP:

Yeah  when I started my YouTube channel about three years ago, I would have been, not all my videos but some of the videos like little slivers of my sense of humor and  a little slivers of my comedic part which might be a total of five or ten seconds over the course of a ten minute video.

So it was relatively small but I just find that so satisfying. I’d be doing a video on how to heal a hurting relationship and to me, sometimes the most satisfying part was like this little ten second cutaway scene where I’m having a conflicting fight with my dog instead of my girlfriend.

So that kind of wet my appetite like the what that feels good. But during that time is making up this story of mine, and during the time of my early YouTube career. made up a story that said it’s bad for business if I’m humorous, because if you’re a coach, healer, teacher whatever the heck it is I am, it is bad for business i you’re funny or you’re humorous. And it was a completely a story fabricated by my own mind, but then as I gradually gave myself permission to more so honor myself rather than honor that story, I started to make more and more and more space for the humorous part of me to come out on camera and to have that is a mode of self-expression as well as sharing my perspectives with the world.

So as I did it, first stuff,  it felt incredibly great. Very very intrinsically satisfying, it’s like a thirst that had been thirsty to redundantly use that word. But it said had been there for most of my life started to get quenched like, “Wow! This is so satisfying”,  it’s like a one of the first forms of art and I really got in touch with.

And then, there was also the external validation from the world that showed not only is it not bad for business, it’s incredibly good for business and in fact in my comedic personality come out on camera is not only good for business, it gives me the problem of having more business coming at me than I can possibly handle.

So apparently, that means the story I told myself was a little bit fictional.

Ashton:

Well it’s interesting too because a lot of the videos kind of play to that exact voice that says like, “oh you need to be this way to be spiritual” and so, if you’re a life coach, you can’t be funny, you have to be serious because you’re dealing with spiritual matters. And so, it kind of makes fun of a lot of that which I think is awesome because it’s very much needed.

What’s your background?

How did you get involved in this type of work?

Do you have a particular path that you follow?

Do you have a spiritual practice,  if you call it something like that?
What is your interaction and background in that?

JP:

Yes to all of that. So bending backwards into my timeline, I’ve been doing emotional healing coaching for about the past fourteen years and how I stumbled into that is when I was eighteen. I went to a few months worth of college and you can take that however you want. That means I either so intelligent that I just graduated early like after a few months sport, that’s how long it took me to fail out of college. Choose your own adventure on that.

So after college fun I was eighteen, I got into personal training, exercise and if I can say this I got pretty passionate about that and that led me pretty quickly into becoming passionate about nutrition. It’s like, “Okay, exercise. Really cool. I can help people but nutrition helps people in a deeper way”  and then from there, nutrition got me passionate into what I would generically call lifestyle coaching and stress reduction.

And then, that quickly got me passionate into these intimate realms of the human mind, heart and soul.

So by the time I was in my very early twenties,  I was rolling around in the Internet realms of the human mind, heart and soul and working with clients. Clients who started off as exercise clients. I would begin working with them in an emotional level, and I call it emotional I think it’s kind of human mind, heart and soul but I call it emotional just to pretend that I’m grounded even though I’m not.

The way  I got connected with a couple very powerful mentors, who I did a lot of not only learning, of acquiring skills to help people, help themselves and to facilitate healing but also most importantly, these mentors helped me work on my own personal healing which is certainly still a work in progress.

What’s heavy on the life of progress to go kind of thing. and that was certainly helped me have become aware and very attentive to what I would call my spiritual life, which is absolutely one of the nearest and dearest things in my heart. And when I look around today and get a little off topic of my history here, but I don’t want you to think you’re in control Ashton,  this ain’t your show anymore.

In my life today, I look at the things I call my spiritual life, I kind of gave up about that, and I do wonder, “okay,  those thing they call my spiritual life meditation, introspection, journaling, wearing a man bun”. Maybe those are things that just make me feel comfortable and happy and they’re important but maybe this thing called life is in fact the most spiritual thing we ever do.

Ashton:

So are you saying that life is more spiritual than a man bun?

JP:

Well I’m saying it Ashton just because I think people need to hear it, but you and I both know it’s not true.

Ashton:

What would you actually characterize as a spiritual life?

JP:

That’s a great question, in a nutshell what seems true to my delusional mind is feeling a sense of connection to something greater than ourselves. Feeling a sense of connection to something greater than who I think I am. And it’s not knowing a connection, it’s not having a theoretical understanding of this, this and this. My astral body connects to my mental body, connects to my body and I can actually do infinite universe of Eckert tollways root chakra(11:40), nothing like that.

To me it is very much typically a subtle scene.

Wow I feel connected to something greater than me, even though my eyes, ears, smell, taste my five senses they report separation but there’s some other subtle sense that reports a sense of connection and unity to we’ll call it something greater than me.

Ashton:

I love that and a lot of yoga kind of looks at that basic situation as well and looks at the role that the ego plays in that. A lot of the stories that we share on the podcast, are stories, Indian stories or stories from the east that look at how the ego is creating a situation where we do feel disconnected and how do we overcome that to feel that connection with others.  I’m curious how you use humor to combat the ego.

JP:

Yeah, that’s a great question, and I think the way I use humor to combat the ego is to actually use humor to embrace the ego rather than fight it.

I think what we resist persists, so if we in that rhyme, so of course I’m gullible enough to believe it. So I think if we try to fight the ego, then it’s just like resistance training a muscle it will get stronger. So to me the language of humor is very much an embracing, almost feminine energy. There’s nothing really resisting that, speaking in statements and telling ourselves here’s what’s true and the ego’s just delusional nature. That’s a very combative language, so for me humor is a way to play with the ego and to actually highlight how damn delusional we are and celebrate it with playfulness.

So I do believe the way to have a life beyond our ego is to embrace our ego ,not try bypass it, not spiritually bypass it  and not deny our humanity and all of our human needs and our human delusions but embracing our ego with humor which facilitates playfulness.

I believe it allows us to actually enjoy having an ego where we give it permission to be in our life and I think when we can do that, not make our ego our enemy then it allows us to begin to have a life beyond our ego as well. And we still got our ego but we can also start lean beyond our ego as well.

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Ashton

I’m curious to get your insight as well, so I think in a lot of spiritual traditions there’s this kind of inherent seriousness to it.

I mean your videos themselves kind of play on that like, “Well this is spirituality and so something that falls outside of this box is not”. And I remember when I was actually driving around India with a buddy of mine, we both had our motorcycles and we were going up around for about a year traveling around India.

JP:

By the way that sounds pretty spiritual right there.

Ashton:

It was super spiritual, let me tell you. But we’re up in the Himalayas, and like we’re talking about like roads that are designed for maybe one car. You’ve got blind turns everywhere, there’s like a three thousand foot drop on one side, there’s giant trucks coming at you. One of the most stressful situations, I’ve ever been in my life. Him and I are doing all of these yoga practice as a meditation, so there’s all this energy getting charged all the time. And we’d get to our stop for each day, for each evening at whatever random place that it was, and if they had electricity like a plug in my computer, my laptop would open up and we’d watch like family guy.

We needed this like just slapstick like it because it was so spiritual. We were on such a spiritual quest, but then like at night, we had to kind of retreat to this like, can we just make fun of everything in life for a moment? because there’s such a burden of it otherwise.

And I’m just kind of curious to get your feeling on that, like how important is humor in balancing off this really serious side that a lot of spiritual disciplines have?

JP:

Personally, to me it’s important and I’m not delusional enough to think that it’s important for everybody. And everybody doesn’t have humorous part of their spiritual practice or part of their glens that they filter their spiritual beliefs and practices through.

Yet I can just say for me it’s very important, when I start to take things seriously I start to need to develop a sense of certainty. That’s why I become serious seriousness facilitate certainty and to me, because that’s how I work, certainty is the polar opposite of spirituality. Spirituality in a nutshell for me, aside from being connected to something greater than yourself and feeling that sense of connection, to me spirituality is exploring the mystery of what’s beyond the comprehension of our human chakra beliefs.

So when we’re serious and therefore facilitating nothing but a sense of certainty, to me that creates a membrane that closes me off from the spiritual realms which are a mystery.

Personally, I feel curiosity and getting rid of a sense of certainty in favor of embracing curiosity which helps us embrace mystery, to me that helps the river of my spiritual practice flow. And again, that’s how I work, certainly not everybody. But I will say this, I will say that someone else said I believe those who said life is too important to take seriously, I just love that. It’s  like yeah, somewhere along the line.

Like, why the hell did we start to believe that important and serious are somehow synonymous? That seriousness equals importance?

What if playfulness is what really equals importance?

Who knows?

I think seriousness can very easily be a state of mind of hyper attachment. I think playfulness can be a state of mind of non-attachment.

Ashton:

Absolutely. You’re talking about connecting to mystery and I asked earlier but it was a multilayered thing, so it got a little lost. But you’re mentioning in here of spiritual practice.

What are your practices that you do that connects you to that mystery or open you up into something larger?

Do you have regular practice that you do? or..

JP:

Yeah! I do four hours of meditation a day. It only takes me five minutes though because I’m good.

Ashton:

Because you’re that spiritual?

JP:

And there is no time so, but yeah, let me get serious here Ashton it’s too important.

Meditation is part of my typical day, we practice not everyday, but most days and it’s a simple twelve minute meditation. The work I do with clients, I’m going to sound a little cliche and also forgive myself for that,  but the clients I work with and they are my teachers and my good days. I’m listening to them, however, I’m hearing my version of their issue realizing they’re are a mirror for me, and they’re here to show me something about myself that I’ve yet to connect with yet, to heal. So the work I do on the professional front for me is very much part of my intentional spiritual practice.

And there’s also the abstract part of a fair bit of introspection in my day. It’s not structured, but it’s there and it probably won’t surprise you, but humor is a part of my spiritual practice as well.

So yeah, I’ve done a lot of reading in my past to be honest with you. I don’t do very much reading spiritual books anything anymore. And I think the last thing I’d mention is pay attention to nature. I mean, I gotta think nature is probably about the most exquisite, spiritual teacher I’ve ever seen. I think everything that’s difficult to see about our humans self is obviously displayed by nature.

The challenging part is bridging the gap between the unseen of our own self with the obviously seen of nature and discovering, what is my version of what nature is teaching me? You watch how a tree grows, how it goes from an acorn to a tree. What the hell does that say about me? Or we watch this bid that nature does things better set out a slow pace

Ashton

The lack of speed. Yeah!

JP:

Yeah! Like the old saying, I don’t know who the hell said it probably Confucius or someone with old long wise beard and probably lice in their hair said,

“Nature never rushes, but everything it’s done”.

So I think finding metaphors especially metaphors in nature is very important part of my spiritual practice.

Ashton:

So I’m curious as well, you talked about humor in the sense of like an actual practice. I’m also curious as how you use humor as an essence and a teaching tool.

How does that kind of playing with your videos, what’s your actual process of making the videos? Is it all kind of just improv in your slapstick around or do you plan a lot of this out?

Is it very calculated?

What’s your process of all?

JP:

It’s great question, the videos are very calculated. When I do in person speaking/performance/engagement while I’m in character a lot of that is improv and I love it.

However the videos are very scripted, there’s a lot of thought, a lot of creativity that goes into the scripting process.

So typically my process is, I take anywhere between two days and two weeks to write the script at the video, it just depends on how big of chunks of time I’m devoting to it, per writing session. Sometimes, it’s five minutes, sometimes it’s an hour and a half or so. Everything it gets done, the nature of JP is just a matter of sometimes it takes more time.

You typically go through a little bit of a rehearsal of the script so that when I turn the camera on, and I’m not saying the words for the first time in and the rehearsal is also an interesting part of the writing process because when I’m saying the lines out loud for the first time, when I’m writing I’m on the page but when I say it out loud, I’ll feel certain things about “Okay, that doesn’t feel quite right. I want to change that to what feels right”.

And then that after the scripting process, a little bit over rehearsal, camera comes on and oftentimes, to produce the five minute long comedy video, oftentimes it’s about four hours worth of filming and in that filming it’s not just like talking to the camera the whole time off.

It’s “Okay,  setup this scene, or change the background, or go to this different location”. And most of the time, I’m just a one man show where I’m turning the camera and jumping in front of it and then doing my thing. And then, once that’s complete, there’s usually another probably four hours or so, I wrapped up in the editing process of the video and sequencing everything together, so that it comes across in a storyline that feels good to me.

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Ashton:

So how do you feel about a little bit earlier about doing our own kind of little lightning around of questions. I know you’re in a lot of the things that you do online, you do live things, facebook live, things like that. You answer questions and stuff.

So I thought we could kind of come together and do a lightning round, a vulgar round, a thunderbolt round. For a show you open to that?

JP:

I wasn’t open to it when you called the lightning round but when you said thunderbolt round, Now I feel more..

Ashton:

Yeahhh…Now it’s serious.

JP:

Greek God, Zeus is speaking through us.

Ashton:

We’re trying to tie it into the Tibetan roots there with the VYDRA(27:17), So you know make it even more spiritual sounding when we do it.

JP:

I love it. First with you brother, I’m excited.

Ashton:

It will do just, first thing that comes off the top of your head, quick answer is we’ll try to keep the whole thing under like a couple of minutes or something like that. So bust out a little. I’ve got a little stopwatch-ish here. So just quick answers off top of your head and we’ll we’ll go. all right?

JP:

And I feel like I’m being set up for like a Sigmund Freud thing. You show me a thing, what comes out, I want to have sex with my mom, wait a minute.

Ashton:

We’re going to dissect that for the next half hour. Okay, here we go, nice deep breath.

And here we go.

Who Is more spiritual pilates teacher in a yoga class or a yoga teacher in a pilates class?

JP:
Got to go, yoga teacher in a pilates class.

Ashton:
Why?

JP:

That’s a good question, because she’ll probably have better tattoos.

Ashton:

Is it okay to cut someone off on the freeway if you’re driving a prius?

JP:
I would say it’s impossible to cut someone off on a freeway if you’re driving a prius.

Ashton:
Why is that?

JP:
Well they get up and go power of a prius, it’s where there’s a smile to the easy environment but it lacks the test faster.

Ashton:
What’s the most spiritual food?

JP:
Got to go with kale on this.

Ashton:

Kale, and why do you choose kale?

JP:
Well I think Kale is the national flag of the veganism, and I think the veganism is by far the most spiritual nutritional philosophy there is. As a vegan,  I don’t think I’m a vegan,  but my character is a vegan. Get so frantic. As a vegan, I conditionally love all beings Ashton. except meat eaters I hate them with passion to accept them.

Ashton:

Well speaking of loving beings unconditionally, if Buddha and Jesus had to battle it to the death in an arena who would win and why?

JP:

I’m going with Jesus on this one. Buddhist strikes me as a little bit too passive maybe obese? To have much of a ground game. So yeah, I think I’m going to go with Jesus on this one, he just strikes me as like a fitter more athletic guy. Though when we think about it, follow me here brother.

Ashton:

I’m with you.

JP:

Jesus obviously equated bread to human flesh.

So the guy was cannibalistic, not a vegan.  He just projected his stone cold desire to eat human flesh and to bread. It’s not symbolic, it’s literal people.

Ashton:

Absolutely.

JP:

So his insatiable ability to relentlessly eat human meat substitutes called bread.

I think the guy was probably heavily gluten intolerant, therefore he ate all this flesh substitute called bread he probably had a lot of intestinal inflammation which probably shut down the function of his core. So he might have been a pretty unstable guy and what does that mean and with regard to his ability to take Buddha in an arena fight,  I don’t know, but it has me second guessing my answer that Jesus would take Buddha.

Ashton:

Maybe he wasn’t turning over those tables in the temple, he was actually falling over and knocking them over.

JP:

Wow, We are ground-breaking right here Ashton.

Ashton:

Back to the badger round, who is the bigger aura Kanye West or Bill Nye the science guy?

JP:
Bill Nye the Science Guy, I’m not convinced that Kanye is a human being.

Ashton:

So he might not have been or at all?

JP:
Can you say Illuminati?

Ashton:

Okay,  there’s another question, Illuminati or blue blood reptiles?

JP:

Yeah! I’m going illuminati all the way on this. My father was half Illuminati, my mother was completely illuminati. So I think that makes me three quarters illuminati.

Ashton:
Now I’m a little worried about our conversation, I double check and make sure things aren’t getting recorded by the N.S.A. or something.  What is the acceptable level of tightness from men’s yoga pants?

JP:

Yeah! if you have circulation in the lower half of your legs, they’re not tight enough. However, If your feet are blue they’re too tight.

Ashton:

Okay So looking at the feet for the signal. Love it, helpful tip.

What is the most spiritual way to ask a woman out in a yoga class?

JP:

Oh it’s obviously letting her know that you’ve had a past life together and that it’s important to explore that past life connection in this present life. Because it’s not just a past life connection, it needs to be a present life connection. And I think it’s just apply that exploring the past life connection in the present life connection. The first and second chakra frictioning and that’s really the only way to do it.

Ashton:

There is a kind of just sparked a memory I lived on an island in Thailand for a number of years and there was a lot of yoga schools and communities and there was a very kind of left hand red tantra schools essentially a cult, a sex cult. But they were kind of claiming that they were trying to school, but the secret code for people from there that wanted to sleep with women, they would ask them if they wanted to come back to their place for a heart meditation.  So that might be another thing to come in like, I would love to sit down and have a heart meditation.

JP:

It’s wonderful, question please that this next part out, but can you send me the website of that school I would like to go?

Ashton:

Absolutely, I mean of course not. but absolutely. Who is the most spiritual person alive today?

JP:

I think it’s his and lightness Spiritual JP

Ashton:

All right. Well we got that five and a half minutes, it wasn’t really the lightning two minute round but I think we still did a pretty good job of keeping it all in, especially considering we’re talking the most spiritual man alive J.P. Sears.

So we had to make sure that we got in all the good stuff.

But hey, thank you for humoring me with that, and just kind of rolling with it was fun.

JP:

For sure and Ashton I think you’re buying into the illusion of time too much did it really take five and a half minutes? Your clock me have told you that but I think your consciousness can transcend the limited consciousness comprehension of your clock.

Ashton

To move beyond space and time, to recognize it as all exactly happening in one moment. I like it, in fact.

JP:

I’m halfway convinced we didn’t even start the lightning round yet.

Ashton:

Exactly! We’ll wait till we hang up the phone and we’re done recording, then it can start.

JP:

Just still pure potential at this point.

Ashton:

All right, so where can people find out about you?  I mean obviously got your YouTube channel to talk a little bit more about that.

I know you’ve talked about a book that’s coming out next year. Tell us a little bit more about how people can get in touch with you, if they want to work with you.

How can they work with you?

JP:

You can visit my website awakenwithhjp.com and all of my social media are awaken with j.P. and if you were to track me down on just one place, my YouTube channel’s probably the most beneficial place to find awaken with JP.

Ashton:

Awesome! which is also the same YouTube, all that sort of good stuff. I have a question, one last question before we close and then.

JP:

My intuition tells me you have a question.

Ashton:

You are so connected. It’s amazing, well guested.

You can’t have a good conversation about spirituality without materialism. When are we going to see the spiritual as hell T. shirts available on your site?

JP:

Great question! I’ve got three pending meetings with different T-shirt companies. As soon as I find the right company that can not only do a good quality job,  also do the order fulfillment service then we will be bringing those medicinal shirts back to the world .

I think that was last summer already and those available and very limited campaign, it wasn’t a permanent basis .But you know what’s wrong in the world, it’s a big question and the most accurate answer is that those T-shirts aren’t widely available in this moment.

So dear world, I will be doing my part to save the world by bringing back those medicinal  T-shirts as soon as I possibly can.

Ashton:

As a matter of fact my intuition is telling me that brags it is your fault and you better get them done before the presidential elections in America. Otherwise, all hell could break loose, it is your responsibility and duty to help heal the wound that we’re all feeling right now. So that we can move forward and enlighten ourselves.

JP:

And the prophecy has been spoken.

Ashton:

Awesome! Well it’s been tons of fun challenge JP. I really appreciate you taking the time, I know you have a really busy schedule. Thank you so much for being on the show today. Any last final words?

JP:

Yeah. I’d like to say thank you Ashton for having me on your show. You have a lovely offering to the world that you would invite me on. And for all you weirdo lovely listeners, I appreciate you taking a time out of your day to entertain brothers Ashton and JP.

Ashton:

Awesome! Yes thank you to all the listeners out there for tuning in with us today. I hope you all have a wonderfully present and super spiritual and funny moment.

Thank you so much for listening today.

Namaste.

Ashton:
Hey everybody, thanks for listening to this show today. Please go over the iTunes, write a review, and let us know what you think. It helps us in creating new content for all of you. It also helps new listeners get a sense of what to expect from the show.

We really appreciate your feedback. Thanks again for listening. Namaste.

Announcer:
You’ve been listening to the Sivana podcast, to find out more about Sivana, go to sivanaspirit.com or follow Sivana on Facebook at facebook.com/sivanaspirit. For daily inspiration, check out our blog at sivanaeast.com. Be sure to join us next week for a new episode and thank you for listening to the Sivana podcast.

About Brett Larkin

Brett is the founder of Uplifted Yoga, an online yoga and meditation community empowering students to personalize their practice and ignite their best life – on and off the mat. She’s instructed at top studios, companies like Google and Pinterest, and leads the world’s most interactive Online Yoga Teacher Training program. She teaches to a social media following of over 150K people. Her content on Youtube is streamed for 2 million minutes each month.

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