Create Your Very Own Tea Garden…


Create Your Very Own Tea Garden



Do you enjoy a cup of warm tea to relax, unwind or to start your day? Creating your own tea garden will allow for you to do that whenever you wish. Just imagine being able to walk out your door and clip a few herbs, steep them and in about 10 minutes. And voila, you can enjoy a cup of fresh herbal tea.

Growing herbs is not difficult as they grow quickly and are naturally pest free, smell and look great in your garden. I personally have found gardening to be meditative and rewarding. I truly enjoy my hands in the cool, moist earth. When the sun touches and warms my skin and when the air blows through my hair, I have found peace and become one with the spaciousness of the world in which I grow – that is my garden.

Setting up your garden

Take a mindful journey around your outdoor space and find a spot that is sunny, well-ventilated and feels good to you for your garden. Work up the soil, remove any rocks or clay that you may find. Use the rocks for display in your garden and set the clay aside.

Worm casting is a great additive to improve the soil. Worms naturally loosen the soil and make it luminous. The casting has no smell to humans but to bugs the castings emit an offensive odor helping to keep bugs at bay. Go to your local garden center and purchase 3 to 4 herbs that you like. You need not purchase the large pots, small pots (starter pots) are perfect. Herbs grow quickly so no need to spend more on larger plants.

Have your garden ready to plant under a New Moon. As the moon begins to wax and grow larger, so will your herbs. Trim herbs under a waining moon. Speaking of trimming, purchase a small pair of pruning scissors or small craft scissors. Clean and dry your clippers after each use. When you trim your herbs, trim just above the next pair of leaves so you will have enough stem to tie off for drying.

Lavender

Featuring a clean, fresh scent for its sedative qualities, traditionally used for calming and soothing. It is also know to help skin quality, reduce acne, and helps to fight free radicals.

Thyme

This herb is packed with numerous health benefits. A thyme leaf is one of the richest sources of potassium, iron, calcium, manganese and selenium. It is also a rich source of many vitamins, B complex, B-carotene, Vitamins A, K, E, C and folic acid.

Purple Sage

This herb dates back to Roman times and is know to have many health benefits. The main essential oil in Sage contains ketones. These compounds are know to have counter irritant, anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal and antiseptic qualities. Thujone is a GABA and serotonin receptor antagonist, thus improving mental concentration, attention span and quickens the senses. A sage infusion has for a long time been recognized as the “thinkers tea”.

Rosemary

Pungent and aromatic, this herb contains phenolic antioxidant rosmarinic acid, cineol, a-pinene and borneol. It is known to have anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, anti-fungi and antiseptic properties.



Parsley

This herb contains essential oils, myristicin, limonene, eugenol  and a-thujene. use in dentistry to help with gum disease also useful in helping to reduce blood sugar levels in diabetics. It is a good source of potassium, manganese, iron and helps with oxygen distribution in the blood.

Preparing the herbs for tea

Now its time to use these amazing herbs and create a delicious, tasty, warm beverage.  When you trim your herbs, be sure to trim enough stem to tie off for drying. You will want a good twine, cotton, hemp (natural twine) tie four to five stems together allowing enough twine to make a loop for hanging.

In the case of parsley cut as close to the ground as possible. Take note that Monarch Butterfly caterpillars love parsley. So, you may want to plant twice what you may use as a monarch caterpillar will devour an entire parsley in a day. Just don’t kill them or spray them, allow these beautiful and colorful creatures in your garden.

Hang your herbs in a cool, dry well ventilated area. A garden shed or your window curtain rod are great places to dry herbs. Let the herbs hang for a week or two, then grind with a mortar and pestle and store in a glass container. I find small mason jars work well.

Use the dried leaves and stems and steep in hot water for approximately 10 minutes. Strain and enjoy.

The best part of having your very own tea garden is you can walk out to it anytime, trim a few leaves and make your own delicious cup of tea.

Namaste.



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Emily Coyner

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Emily is a healing coach, she uses meditation, yoga and good food as her modalities to a life of balance…

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