5 Things You Didn’t Know About Yantras

 

Yantras have been used for thousands of years in the east and have been the obsession of countless yogis throughout history. Even today, people with almost zero knowledge about these beautiful pieces of art become transfixed by them, often stopping to stare in art galleries.

But what kind of true significance do yantras have? What is their hidden meaning?

SEE ALSO: Buddhism And Hinduism: The Similarities And Differences


Gemstone CVO

It is not merely symbolic; the geometry, sages say, appeared to self-realized yogis in samadhi (the highest state of meditation).

 

It is said to be the geometric representation of the most sacred sounds in the Universe.


‘Om’ sounded in tonoscope (an instrument used to create patterns corresponding to different sounds) creates a geometric pattern similar to that of a Yantra.

 

Sometimes it’s crazy when you see something like this. Science and spirituality coming together in unexpected ways! And no, I don’t think this is a coincidence. It looks exactly as the sages claimed: they saw this symbol in the deepest state of meditation.


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The center is formed by 5 downward triangles and 4 upright triangles, a representation of female and male principles.

 

The downward triangles represent the female principle (Shakti) and the upright triangles represent the male principle (Shiva). All 9 triangles together lead to a creation of 43 smaller triangles; each one of these represents a deity associated with a certain aspect of existence.


Yantras represent the pilgrimage for a yogi; with each step, the yogi comes from outside themselves to the inner sanctum.

 

Yantras map a seeker’s spiritual journey from the earthly plane to final enlightenment. That means shifting the awareness from the outside to the inside. The middle of the yantra represents the center of the Universe, the place of origin and unity where one merges with the supreme consciousness.


The Sringeri Temple has an impossibly perfect Yantra.

 

The Sringeri Temple is the first matha (center of religious studies) set up by Adi Shankaracharya. Shankaracharya was an important reformer in the 8th-century C.E.

This is particularly amazing because their ability to create this artwork was extremely limited and mathematically very challenging. It’s not understood how they created it without the Fibonacci series.


Tibetan Om Singing Bowl
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Matt Caron
Matt is the content manager of the Sivana blog, an enthusiastic Yoga teacher, and life voyager. He strives to inspire conscious living and conscious dialogue- not only for others but for himself. He's the founder of TheYogaBlog.com. You can find him on Facebook.

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