End Worrying Forever With These 5 Buddhist Teachings

 

In Eastern traditions, the mind said to be the cause of our bondage and the cause of our liberation. It’s in the mind that the entire field of spirituality plays out. But many aspects of the mind are not considered a necessary part of its functions; in particular, worrying is taught to be one of the lowest things we can do.

To stop worrying is tough, but it’s not impossible. If we adopt a few notions on worrying from the Buddhists, an astounding change can take place. Here’s how to do it!

SEE ALSO: Just What Does It Mean To Be A Yogi?


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1) Understand the Mind

In India, it’s common knowledge that the best analogy to the human mind is a monkey. Monkies love jumping from one tree to another, similar to how our mind jumps from one thought to another. When something attention-grabbing comes up, the mind naturally wants to think about; the only problem is that it easily slides into worrying. This requires awareness in order to stop it.

2. Walk Away

The more you worry the more you become agitated. We get wrapped up in something that may not even necessarily exist! The important thing is to take a step back and get out of that energetic ‘space’ by letting go of that thought pattern, or even to walk away for a bit. This will help you see it from a different angle, and with a more objective lens.

3. Know it Doesn’t Help

In of itself, worrying doesn’t help anything. Think of all the times you worried about things in the past. Did it help in any way? Notice how you are in the present moment with your current worry, and ask yourself if it will be any different.

4. Stop Searching for a Solution

We worry because we feel out of control in certain situations. We’re searching for a way to feel in control again. The uncertainty can be hard for the ego to accept. Instead of fighting that uncertainty, learn to embrace it. The bottom line is you can’t control everything and the universe operates on change. It’s a hard truth, but one that defines our life…whether we want it to or not.

5. Mindfulness

When we practice mindfulness, we actually allow things to fall into place. We swim in the present moment, part of us deep inside is detached from the outcome. It gives us a sense of peace and contentment. Things flow easier when we don’t push them to happen.


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Matt Caron
Matt is the content manager of the Sivana blog, an enthusiastic Yoga teacher, and life voyager. He strives to inspire conscious living and conscious dialogue- not only for others but for himself. He's the founder of TheYogaBlog.com. You can find him on Facebook.
Matt Caron

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